In this episode of Magness & Marcus on Coaching, we take on one of the oft-forgotten and misunderstood items in the world of running: the Neural component. Starting off with defining the CNS and motor programming in coaches speak, we take a look at how to integrate this type of work in the realm of distance running. Investigating sprinting, drills, lifting, and ploy’s we try and give the listener an understanding of when we implement these items (hint: not thrown in after a workout), how much we need, and what type we need.

Before ending, we get into two of my favorite topics when discussing neural work: Fatigue and priming. CNS or neural fatigue is one of the most misunderstood concepts in the endurance world. As it’s a fatigue that we runners don’t quite understand. We’re used to feeling drained or tired after really long runs or hard workouts which give us this sensation of fatigue. With neural fatigue, our trained senses often betray us. Understanding what neural fatigue feels like and how long it takes to bounce back from is key to understanding how to program this work. Lastly, with priming, we can use neural work like sprinting, hops, or ploys to get the body primed to perform at peak physical performance the next day. After this podcast, you should have a better understanding of how to implement these concepts in your training.

As always, let us know if you have any topics you want to hear covered or comments on any of our shows,

Steve & Jon


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Resources you might want to check out:


The Neuromechanics of Human Movement by Roger Enoka

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1 Comment

  1. M Ralston on March 29, 2015 at 12:09 pm

    Hi Steve, another interesting podcast, thanks for taking the time. I heard John and yourself talk about jump rope, ladders and sprints as ideas of this kind of work. Are there any other specific drills or plyometric exercises that you would recommend? Thanks

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